Medicare covers the cost of dental implantation

Medicare Coverage for Diabetes Supplies and Services This official government manual contains important information about:

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1 Medicare Coverage for Diabetes Supplies and Services This official government manual contains important information on: What expenses are covered? What Expenses Are Not Covered Valuable Health Maintenance Tips Where to Go for More Information

2 2 The information in this manual was up-to-date at the time of printing. occur after printing. Go to or call MEDICARE () for the latest information. TTY users should call.

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4 4 Introduction This manual explains Medicare coverage for diabetes accessories and benefits under Original Medicare and Medicare Medicare Medicare Insurance (Part D). Original Medicare is a single-service-reimbursement insurance where the state pays your healthcare providers directly for Medicare Part A (hospital) and / or Part B (health) benefits. If you have additional insurance that supplements the original Medicare, such as a Medicare supplementary insurance policy (Medigap), this may pay for part of the cost listed in this manual. For more information, contact the benefit administration of your health insurance company. If you are a member of the Medicare Advantage Plan (such as an HMO or a PPO) or another Medicare health insurance company, your health insurance company must offer you at least the same protection as original Medicare, although it may have different rules. Your costs, rights, consumer protection, and health service choices may include: different if you are a member of one of these plans. You may also be entitled to additional services. Read through the materials provided by the health insurance company or call their benefits administration for more information about your benefits. Before reading through the following sections, you should familiarize yourself with the following terms: Co-insurance: This is the amount for which you may or may not be able to pay. as a proportion of the cost of services after you have paid any co-payments. Co-insurance is usually a percentage (e.g. 20%). Coverage: This is the amount you need to pay for health insurance or prescriptions before Original Medicare, your drug insurance, or other insurance begins to pay. Medicare Approved Amount: Under Medicare Original, this is the maximum amount that a physician or service provider who accepts referrals can charge. lower than the actual amount charged by the doctor or service provider. Medicare pays part of this amount, and you are responsible for the difference in price.

5 Section 1: Overview of Medicare Coverage for Diabetes Expenses The table on pages 6-8 gives you a quick overview of some of the benefits and diabetes accessories covered by Medicare (Part B and Part D). In general, Medicare Part B (health insurance) covers the benefits that affect diabetics. Medicare Part B also covers the cost of some screening services for members who are at risk of diabetes. Medicare Part D (drug insurance) also pays the expense of diabetes supplies needed to inject or inhale insulin. You must be a Part B member to receive benefits and supplies that are covered by Medicare. You must be on Medicare drug insurance for your supplies to be covered under Part D. 5

6 6 Section 1: Overview of Medicare Coverage for Diabetes Expenses Accessories / Benefits What's Paid You Pay Antidiabetic Drugs See page 16. Medicare Part D pays for all anti-diabetic drugs that maintain blood sugar levels (glucose). Co-insurance or additional payment, etc. Also a part of D's own contribution for diabetes screenings See page 18. Training in diabetes self-care See page for diabetes devices and accessories (devices and accessories for blood sugar level self-care on page 10). Diabetes supplies See page 16. Medicare Part B will pay for these tests if your doctor thinks you are at risk of diabetes. You are entitled to up to two diabetes screenings per year. Part B covers the cost of outpatient training for patients at risk of complications caused by diabetes, as well as those recently diagnosed with diabetes, in order to teach them proper diabetes self-care. Your doctor or health care provider must issue a written referral to a recognized training program for diabetes self-care. As a permanent medical device, Part B comes at the expense of blood glucose level monitors for home use, as well as the cost of accessories that are used with the device, such as: Blood sugar (glucose) test strips, lancing devices and lancets. There may be Restrictions on how many accessories you can get and how often. Part D covers the cost of certain medical supplies necessary for insulin administration (e.g. syringes, needles, alcohol swabs, gauze, and devices for insulin inhalation). No co-insurance, copayment and no Part B co-insurance Generally, 20% of the Medicare approved amount for medical appointments 20% of the Medicare approved amount after deducting the annual Part B co-insurance 20% of the Medicare approved amount after deducting the annual Part B co-insurance or additional payment, etc. also a part D personal contribution

7 Section 1: Overview of Medicare Coverage for Diabetes Expenses 7 Accessories / Benefits What You Pay For Influenza and Pneumococcal Vaccination See page 22. Influenza vaccination to protect you from the flu and influenza viruses. This is usually only covered once per flu season in autumn or winter. You will need a flu shot for the current flu virus every year. Medicare Part B will cover the cost of this vaccination. No co-insurance, co-payment or a part B own contribution if your doctor or health care provider accepts the referral. Examination and treatment of the feet See page 21. Glaucoma examination See page 22. Insulin See page 16. Pneumococcal vaccination to protect you against pneumococcal infections (e.g. certain types of pneumonia). Most members only need this vaccination once in a lifetime. Medicare Part B will cover the cost of this vaccination. Part B pays for a foot exam every 6 months for members with peripheral diabetic neuropathy and loss of sensation unless they have had an appointment with a podiatrist for other reasons. Part B pays the expenses for glaucoma examinations. This is covered once every 12 months for members at risk of glaucoma. You are at high risk of glaucoma if you are diabetic, have a family history of glaucoma, are African American over 50 years of age, or Hispanic American over 65 years of age. The examination must be carried out by a state-approved ophthalmologist. Medicare Part D pays the cost of insulin that is not delivered by an insulin pump. 20% of the amount approved by Medicare after deduction of the annual Part B contribution 20% of the amount approved by Medicare after deduction of the annual Part B contribution Co-insurance or co-payment, etc. also a part D personal contribution

8 8 Section 1: Overview of Medicare Coverage for Diabetes Expenses Accessories / Benefits What Is Paid You Pay Insulin Pumps See page 13. Medical Nutritional Therapy See page 21. Orthopedic shoes or insoles See page 13. Welcome to Medicare Medical Checkup See page 22. As Permanent Medical Devices, Part B covers the cost of external insulin pumps for members who meet certain requirements, as well as the cost of insulin used with the device. Part B may come for the cost of nutritional medical therapy and related services if you have diabetes or kidney disease and your doctor has prescribed such treatment. Part B covers orthopedic shoes or insoles for people with diabetes who have severe diabetic foot disease. The doctor who treats your diabetes must certify your need for orthopedic shoes or insoles. The shoes and inserts must be prescribed by a podiatrist or other qualified doctor and provided by a podiatrist, orthotist, prosthetist, or pedorthist. Part B pays for a one-time health report, as well as training and advice on preventive measures, including certain screenings, vaccinations, and referral for further treatment if necessary. 20% of the Medicare Approved Amount after Part B Annual Coverage is settled. No co-insurance, co-payment or a part B own contribution if your doctor or health care provider accepts the referral. 20% of the Medicare approved amount after deducting the annual Part B co-payment. No co-insurance, co-payment, or Part B co-payment if your doctor or healthcare provider accepts the referral. No co-insurance, co-payment or a part B own contribution if your doctor or health care provider accepts the referral. Annual wellness appointment See page 23. Please note: You must have the visit within the first 12 months you have Part B. If you have been a member of Part B for more than 12 months, you are entitled to an annual wellness appointment Develop or update a prevention plan tailored to your current health and risk factors. No co-insurance, co-payment or a part B own contribution if your doctor or health care provider accepts the referral. You have to wait at least 12 months after the Welcome to Medicare Screening before you can book your annual wellness appointment.

9 9 Section 2: Medicare Part B-Covered Diabetes Accessories This section provides information about Medicare Part B (health insurance) and the cost of diabetes accessories coverage. Medicare will pay for certain accessories if you are a Part B member and have diabetes. This includes the following accessories: Devices and accessories for self-monitoring of blood sugar levels. See page insulin pumps. See page 13. Therapeutic shoes or insoles. See page

10 10 Section 2: Medicare Coverage of Diabetes Accessories Part B Costs of Blood Glucose Monitoring Devices and Accessories As permanent medical devices, Medicare Part B covers the cost of blood sugar level (blood glucose) meters and accessories for members who have diabetes suffer even if you don't use insulin. Self-check accessories include: Blood glucose level meters Blood glucose test strips Lancing devices and lancets Blood glucose control solutions to check the correctness of the test devices and test strips Part B covers the costs of the same blood glucose test devices and accessories for all members who suffer from diabetes, even if they are not using insulin. However, the same amount of accessories is not covered. If you use insulin, you are entitled to up to 300 test strips and 300 lancets every three months. If you are not using insulin, you are entitled to up to 100 test strips and 100 lancets every three months. If your doctor deems it health necessary, Medicare will send you extra test strips and lancets. Health required means that certain services or accessories are necessary for the diagnosis or treatment of your illness and that these comply with the accepted standard guidelines. You may have to Keep a record of how often you actually measure your blood sugar levels. If you have any questions about diabetes accessories, call MEDICARE (). TTY users should call. NEW: If you live in an area that participates in the Durable Medical Equipment, Prosthetics, Orthotics, and Supplies (DMEPOS) tendering program and you purchase your diabetes supplies by post, the amount you paid may change from January 2013 onwards. to change. You can get your accessories from January to June 2013 from any supplier. It is planned that a nationwide shipping program will begin in July 2013 that will save you money on diabetic testing supplies. After the program goes into effect and you want the supplies shipped to you at home, you will need to use a Medicare contract provider to get Medicare covered for these diabetic testing supplies. You will also save money by having the products delivered to your home. Medicare will publish more information about this program before it goes into effect.

11 Section 2: Medicare coverage of expenses for diabetes accessories under Part B 11 Devices and accessories for self-monitoring of blood sugar levels (continued) What do I need from my doctor in order to obtain these accessories? Medicare will only cover the cost of self-monitoring devices and accessories if you have a doctor's prescription. The prescription must include: Whether you have diabetes. What kind of blood sugar level monitor you need and why you need it. (If you need special monitoring equipment because of impaired vision, your doctor should explain this.) Whether you are using insulin. How often should you measure your blood sugar level. How many test strips and lancets you need per month. Where can I get these accessories? You can order and collect your accessories from the pharmacy. You can obtain your accessories from a medical accessories supplier. In general, a provider is a company, person or agency that offers you medical goods or services, except when you are being treated as an inpatient in a hospital or nursing home. If you purchase your accessories in this way, you will have to place the order yourself. You need a prescription from your doctor to place your order, but your doctor cannot order the accessories for you. Please note the following: You must request a repeat prescription for your accessories. You will need a new prescription for lancets and test strips from your doctor every 12 months. Please note: Medicare will not pay for any accessories that you did not order or for accessories that were automatically sent to you by a supplier, including blood glucose meters, test strips and lancets. If goods or misleading advertisements are automatically sent to you, or if you suspect fraud relating to your diabetes, call MEDICARE (). TTY users should call. You must obtain your supplies from a pharmacy or provider that participates in Medicare. Medicare will not pay the cost if you use a non-Medicare pharmacy or provider. You will be responsible for all costs for supplies obtained through non-Medicare pharmacies or providers.

12 12 Section 2: Medicare coverage of expenses for diabetes accessories under Part B Devices and accessories for self-monitoring of blood sugar levels (continued) How are claims settled? All pharmacies and providers that participate in Medicare must file their claims for blood sugar (glucose) test strips. You cannot submit claims for blood sugar (glucose) test strips yourself. You should also ensure that the pharmacy or provider accepts orders for Medicare-covered supplies. An order is an agreement between you (the Medicare member), Medicare, and a doctor or other health care provider or provider. This may be possible for you. Save money. If the pharmacy or provider accepts orders, Medicare will pay the pharmacy or provider directly. If you get your accessories for assigned claims from a pharmacy or provider, you only pay the cost of your co-insurance. If your pharmacy or your provider does not accept orders, the costs may be charged. higher and you may pay more. In addition, at the time of the service you may have to pay all costs yourself and wait for Medicare to reimburse you for part of the costs. Which pharmacy or provider should I use? It is important that you ask the pharmacy or provider the following questions before purchasing your supplies from them: Do you participate in Medicare? Do you take orders? If the answer to either of these questions is no, you should call another provider or pharmacy in your area who will answer yes to both questions so you can be sure that Medicare will pay for you and you will Save money. Ask them the same questions. If you can't find a Medicare vendor or pharmacy in your area that is part of Medicare and taking orders, consider shipping your supplies. This may be possible for you. Save money.

13 Section 2: Medicare coverage of expenses for diabetes accessories under Part B 13 Devices and accessories for self-monitoring of blood sugar levels (continued) Insulin pumps The costs for external insulin pumps, as well as the insulin used with the pump, may be included. Covered for some Medicare Part B members who have diabetes and meet certain conditions. Insulin pumps are considered permanent medical devices. Permanent medical devices are specific medical devices ordered by your doctor for home use. How do I get an insulin pump? If you need an insulin pump, your doctor will prescribe one for you. Please Note: Under Original Medicare, you pay 20% of the Medicare Authorized Amount after Part B annual co-payment has been met. Medicare will pay 80% of the cost of the insulin pump. Medicare will also pay for the insulin used with the insulin pump. For more information on permanent medical devices and diabetes accessories, please call MEDICARE (). TTY users should call. Therapeutic Shoes or Insoles If you are a Part B member and meet certain requirements (see below), Medicare will pay for therapeutic shoes if you need them. The types of shoes that are covered annually include one of the following: One pair of deep insoles and three pairs of insoles One pair of custom-shaped shoes (and insoles) if you cannot wear deep insoles due to a foot deformity. and two additional pairs of insoles. Please note: In certain cases, Medicare will pay for separate insoles, or for changes to shoes in lieu of insoles.

14 14 Section 2: Medicare Coverage of Diabetes Accessories Part B Therapeutic Shoes or Insoles (continued) How do I get Therapeutic Shoes? In order for Medicare to cover the cost of your therapeutic shoes, your treating physician must ensure that you meet these three conditions: 1. You have diabetes. 2. You have one or both feet with at least one of the following: Partial or complete foot amputation. Previous foot ulcers. Calluses that could lead to foot ulcers comprehensive diabetes care plan and require therapeutic shoes and / or insoles due to diabetes. Medicare also requires that: The shoes are prescribed by a podiatrist or other specialist The shoes are prescribed by a doctor or other specialist such as adapted and made available to a foot specialist, orthopedic surgeon or prosthodontist

15 15 Section 3: Medicare Part D Coverage of Diabetes Expenses This section provides information on Medicare Part D (Medicare drug insurance) for Medicare members at risk of diabetes. To become a member of Medicare drug insurance, you must be a member of Medicare health insurance. For information on Medicare drug insurance, go to or call MEDICARE () TTY TTY users should call. The following diabetes drugs and accessories are covered by Medicare health insurance: Insulin. See page 16. Antidiabetic drugs. See page 16. Certain diabetes accessories. See page 16.

16 16 Section 3: Medicare Part D Diabetes Care Insulin Medicare health insurance plans pay for injectable insulin that is not used with an insulin infusion pump and for insulin that is inhaled. Antidiabetic drugs A blood sugar (glucose) level that cannot be controlled with insulin is treated with antidiabetic drugs. Medicare health insurance companies pay for antidiabetic drugs such as: sulfonylureas (e.g. glipizide and glyburide) biguanides (e.g. metformin) thiazolidiniones, such as e.g. Actos (pioglitazone), Avandia (rosiglitazone) and Rezulin (troglitazone) meglitinides, which are a type of anti-diabetic drugs, including Starlix (nateglinide) and Prandin (repaglinide) alphaglucosidase inhibitors (e.g. Precose) diabetes accessories for injection or inhalation of diabetes insulin supplies Medicare Part B members may paid. These items include the following: Syringes, needles, alcohol swabs, bandages, insulin inhalation devices For More Information For more information about Medicare drug insurance, do one of the following: Go to Call MEDICARE. TTY users should call. Call your State Health Insurance Assistance Program (SHIP). To get the phone number, go to or call MEDICARE ().

17 17 Section 4: Diabetes Services Covered by Medicare All of the services listed in this section are covered by Medicare Part B (Health Insurance) unless otherwise stated. Medicare bears the cost of certain services for members with diabetes. In general, your doctor will need to provide you with a prescription or referral in order to receive these benefits. You should get these services as soon as possible after your doctor writes the prescription. Make sure you have the written prescription before seeking the services. These benefits include: Diabetes screenings. See page 18. Diabetes Self-Management Training. See Medical Nutritional Therapy page. See page 21. Hemoglobin A1c test. See page 22. You can receive some of the Medicare-covered benefits without a written prescription or referral. These services include the following: foot examination and treatment. See page 21. Glaucoma Examination. See page 22. Preventive Appointments (Welcome to Medicare Screening and Annual Wellness Appointments) Influenza and pneumococcal vaccination. See page 22. Preventive Appointments (Welcome to Medicare Screening and Annual Wellness Appointments). See page

18 18 Section 4: Diabetes Services Covered by Medicare Diabetes Screening Medicare covers the cost of diabetes screening if you are at risk of diabetes. These examinations serve to identify diabetes at an early stage. Some of the requirements that may mean you are at risk of diabetes include: high blood pressure dyslipidemia (a history of abnormal cholesterol and trilyceride levels obesity (under certain conditions) impaired glucose (blood sugar) tolerance high fasting glucose (blood sugar) levels Medicare pays every 12 months for two diabetes screenings. After the first diabetes screening, your doctor will decide when to carry out the second one. Diabetes screenings include: Examination of the fasting glucose (blood sugar) level. If you are at risk of diabetes, discuss with your doctor whether you are eligible for Medicare-covered diabetes screenings. Diabetes Self-Care Training Diabetes Self-Care Training teaches you how to successfully manage your diabetes yourself must prescribe this training, otherwise Medicare will not bear the costs cht. You are eligible for diabetes self-management training if you met any of these requirements in the past 12 months: You have been diagnosed with diabetes. You have started taking diabetes medication or you have switched from oral diabetes medication to insulin. You have diabetes and you recently joined Medicare. You are at risk from complications caused by diabetes (see below). Your doctor may keep you at risk for complications from diabetes if you have any of the following conditions: you have difficulty controlling your blood sugar level, you have been treated in an emergency room, or you have been hospitalized overnight for your diabetes. You have been diagnosed with an eye disease caused by your diabetes. You have lost sensation in your feet or have other problems with your feet, e.g. Ulcers, deformities, or amputation. You have been diagnosed with kidney failure caused by diabetes.

19 Section 4: Diabetes Services Covered by Medicare 19 Diabetes Self-Care Training (continued) Typically, your doctor will tell you where the diabetes self-care training is taking place. You must select an approved diabetes self-care training program as part of a care plan developed by your doctor or other knowledgeable professional. These programs are certified by the American Diabetes Association or the Indian Health Service. How Much Training is Covered? The classes are taught by health care professionals who specialize in diabetes. You are entitled to a total of 10 hours of introductory training within a period of 12 continuous months, and then to 2 hours of further training per year. One of the lessons can be done as a one-to-one lesson. The remaining 9 hours are held as group lessons. The introductory training must be completed within 12 months of the start of the training. Important: Your doctor can prescribe up to 10 hours of one-to-one lessons if you are blind or deaf, have language problems, or if no group lessons are available within 2 months of the doctor's prescription. In order to be entitled to 2 more hours of training per year after the introductory training in the first year, you must again obtain a doctor's prescription. The 2 hours of further training can take place in group or individual lessons. Don't forget that your doctor will have to prescribe this training every year or Medicare will not pay the costs. Please note: If you live in a rural area, you may be able to Attend diabetes self-management training at a Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC). FQHCs are special health centers that are usually located in rural areas. They offer routine health checkups at discounted prices. Some types of FQHCs include community health centers, tribe FQHC clinics, state-approved state health clinics, migrant health centers, and homeless health programs. For more information on FQHCs, please go to or call MEDICARE (). TTY users should call.

20 20 Section 4: Diabetes Services Covered by Medicare Diabetes Self-Care Training (continued) What Will I Learn In This Training? You will learn to successfully control your diabetes yourself. This includes information about self-sufficiency and lifestyle adjustments. The first lesson is a personal review to help the instructors better understand your needs.

21 Section 4: Diabetes Services Covered by Medicare 21 Nutritional Therapy In addition to diabetes self-care training, nutritional medical therapy is provided to members with diabetes or kidney failure. To be eligible for this service, your fasting blood sugar level must meet certain criteria. In addition, your doctor must prescribe these services for you. These services can be provided by a nutritionist or certain nutritionists. These services may include: An initial diet and lifestyle assessment Diet advice (what to eat and how to stick to a personalized nutrition plan) How to deal with various everyday factors that affect your diabetes Follow-up exams to assess your progress in nutritional control Remember that your doctor must prescribe this medical nutritional therapy every year or Medicare will not pay the costs. Please note: If you live in a rural area, you may be able to Participate in nutritional medical therapy at a Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC). For more information on FQHCs, go to fqhc.asp or call MEDICARE (). TTY users should call. Foot Exams and Treatment If you have nerve damage caused by diabetes in one of your feet, Medicare will pay for a foot exam by a podiatrist or other podiatrist every 6 months, unless you have had one for other reasons within the last 6 months Had an appointment with a pedicure specialist. Medicare covers appointments, among other things. more often if you have had a partial or complete non-injury amputation of your foot or feet, or if your feet have changed their appearance, which could be a sign that you have a serious foot condition. Don't forget that you should also be under the care of your GP or diabetes specialist while you are taking care of your feet.

22 22 Section 4: Diabetes Services Covered by Medicare Hemoglobin A1c Test A hemoglobin A1c test is a laboratory test prescribed by your doctor. It measures how well your blood sugar level has been checked over the past three months. Call MEDICARE () for more information. TTY users should call. Glaucoma Checkups Medicare will pay for a glaucoma checkup once every 12 months if you are at risk. This examination must be carried out or supervised by an ophthalmologist who is legally recognized in your state to carry out such examinations. Flu and Pneumococcal Vaccinations Medicare typically pays for one flu shot per season, given in the fall or winter. Medicare also pays for a pneumococcal vaccination. A pneumococcal vaccination may be enough for you. for life. Welcome to Medicare Health Checkup Medicare Part B covers the cost of a one-time health review, as well as training and advice on preventive measures. This includes training on specific screenings, vaccinations and, if necessary, transferring them to other services. While the Welcome to Medicare Screening is not a diabetes check-up, it is a good opportunity to discuss with your doctor what preventive care services you may need, such as: a diabetes screening. Please note: Medicare will pay for this appointment if you receive it within the first 12 months of becoming a Part B member.

23 Section 4: Diabetes Services Covered by Medicare 23 Annual Wellness Appointment If you've been a Part B member for over 12 months, you are entitled to an annual wellness appointment to develop or update a personalized plan taking into account your current health and risk factors. This appointment includes: A review of your medical and family history A list of your current caregivers and prescriptions Height, blood pressure, and other routine measurements A screening program with appropriate checkups A list of your risk factors and treatment options Accessories and care benefits not covered by Medicare Original Medicare and Medicare drug insurance do not cover all costs. Diabetes accessories and non-paid care benefits include: Eye examination for glasses (called refraction) Orthopedic shoes (shoes for patients whose feet are impaired but undamaged. Cosmetic surgery Who can I contact if I have questions about them What does Medicare cover? Call MEDICARE () TTY users should call.

24 24 Section 4: Diabetes Services Covered by Medicare Notes

25 25 Section 5: Helpful Tips and Resources Additional information is available to assist you in making choices and making decisions about your health care. You can order free brochures online and search for information. If you don't have a computer, your local library or senior citizen center may be able to help you. to be helpful. For more information on diabetes, go to

26 26 Section 5: Helpful Tips and Resources Information for Members with Limited Income and Assets Extra Help for Medicare Drug Insurance Costs. Eligible for Medicare Extra Help to help you pay for medical expenses if your annual income is less than $ ($ for married members living with only their spouse and no other dependents) and your net worth Less than $ ($ for married members living with only their spouse and no other dependents). These are the amounts from These amounts may differ in 2013. to change. If you live in Alaska or Hawaii, or pay more than half the cost of living for dependent family members, the income limits are higher. To get answers to your questions about additional assistance with paying your drug bills, call your State Health Insurance Assistance Program (SHIP). To get her phone number, go to contacts or call MEDICARE (). TTY users should call.State Pharmacy Assistance Programs (SPAPs) Several states offer State Pharmacy Assistance Programs (SPAPs) to help certain members pay drug bills. Each SPAP has its own rules on how to provide drug cost support to its members. Depending on which state you live in, there are different ways in which the SPAP can help you pay medical expenses. For more information about the SPAP in your state, call MEDICARE or your State Health Insurance Assistance Program (SHIP). Diabetes Control Tips There are many ways you can get your diabetes under control. Here are several tips that can help you stay healthy. Eating Properly Talk to your doctor about what you are eating, how much you are eating, and when you are eating. Your doctor, diabetes educator, or other health care provider can develop a healthy diet plan for you. Discuss how much you should weigh with your doctor. Your doctor can discuss various ways of achieving your desired weight with you.

27 Section 5: Helpful Tips and Sources 27 Diabetes Control Tips (continued) Taking Medication Take your medication as prescribed. Talk to your doctor if you have difficulty doing exercise. Exercise You should be physically active for 30 minutes most days. Discuss what activities can help you with this with your doctor. What to Check? Check your blood sugar (glucose) levels as often as your doctor recommends. You should write this information down in a report booklet. Show this record book to your doctor. Look for cuts, blisters, ulcers, swelling, redness, and inflamed toenails on your feet. It is very important that you keep your feet healthy to avoid serious foot problems. Measure your blood pressure often. Ask your doctor to measure your cholesterol levels. If you are a smoker it is a good idea to speak to your doctor about how to stop this. Medicare pays for programs to help you quit smoking through counseling, if your doctor directs you to do so. These tips can help you manage your diabetes. You should discuss your treatment with your doctor, diabetes educator, or other health care provider, what tests you need, and how to control your diabetes. They are there to help. You should also discuss the various treatment options with your doctor. You and your doctor can decide what is best for you. You can also get more information by contacting the organizations listed on the next two pages. Additional information is available to assist you in making choices and making decisions about your health care. You can order free brochures online and search for information. If you don't have a computer, your local library or senior citizen center may be able to help you. to be helpful.

28 28 Section 5: Helpful Tips and Resources Telephone Numbers and Web Pages For more information about diabetes, go to or contact one of the following organizations: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Department of Health and Human Services ( DHHS) (Inquiries and Publications) CDC Division of Diabetes Translation 1600 Clifton Road Atlanta, Georgia Food and Drug Administration (FDA), DHHS Healthfinder Indian Health Service Division of Diabetes Treatment & Prevention 5300 Homestead Road, NE Albuquerque, New Mexico 87110

29 Section 5: Helpful Tips and Resources 29 Telephone Numbers and Web Pages (Continued) National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP) National Diabetes Education Program One Diabetes Way Bethesda, Maryland National Institute of Diabetes & Digestive & Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), DHHS (Clearinghouse) (Clearinghouse) National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse 1 Information Way Bethesda, Maryland

30 30 Section 5: Helpful Hints and Resources Notes

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32 32 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services 7500 Security Boulevard Baltimore, Maryland Penalty for personal use of an official item, $ 300 Medicare's Coverage of Diabetes Supplies & Services MEDICARE () TTY: This is an official product of the US Government CMS Product No G Revised August 2013