How can we use many pronouns together?

Replace nouns with pronouns

Pronouns help to connect sentences and to create relationships between people and things that are named.

Examples:

I'll meet my boyfriend tomorrow. We usually only see each other on weekends.

The dress belongs mineSister.

The iPhone, the I bought yesterday is the newest model on the market.

This Year I would like to go skiing with the sports youth.

The examples show you that pronouns can have very different forms.


One distinguishes between:

  • Personal pronouns
  • relative pronoun
  • possessive pronouns
  • Demonstrative pronouns

Personal pronouns

The personal pronouns I you he she it we you they serve as Deputy For Nouns (Noun).
You used them to make a noun not to repeat over and over again.
So if a noun has already been mentioned in the text, use a pronoun if you want to use it again.
For example:

Louisa is in my class. you had birthday yesterday. I have you worried a gift.

The marked pronouns all refer to Louisa.

The first personal pronoun (you) is in Nominative.
The second (you) but im dative.

So you have to put the pronouns in Number, gender and adapt case.

You can find a leaflet on parts of speech here.

Nominative: I you he she it we you they
Accusative: me, you, him / her / it, us, you, yourself
Dative: me, you, him / her, us, you, yourself

possessive pronouns

Possessive pronouns are: mine, your, his, her, our, your, you. Most of the time they stand in front of you noun .

They show that possession (my book) or the Affiliation (our teacher).

Possessive pronouns must also be in Number, gender and case match with their reference word.

Examples:

OurGerman teacher is still quite young.

feminine, singular, nominative


OurMath teacher, on the other hand, is quite old.

masculine, singular, nominative


Most mineTeachers are fine.

masculine, plural, genitive

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relative pronoun

Relative pronouns connect two clauses with each other (main clause + subordinate clause).
They refer to a noun that is mentioned in the first part of the sentence compound.
Sentences that are introduced by a relative pronoun are called Relative clauses.

Relative pronouns are: that, that, that and which. There are also the forms: that, that, whose, whose, whom ...

Examples:
I am happy about the cinema tickets,the / which i won.

I am happy about the win,the / whichI wasn't expecting at all.

The relative pronoun and the noun it refers to must match. Number, gender and case you have to adjust.

relative pronoun stand Behind the noun they are referring to. items stand in front the noun!

Demonstrative pronouns

Demonstrative pronouns give clues to a very specific person or thing. They are common in the spoken language.

This, that, that, the same, such are demonstrative pronouns.

Again, you have to go again Number, gender and case align.

Then there are other forms: this, this, this, this, that, that, that, that, the same, the same, the same, the same ...

Examples:
Exactly such I would like to have shoes too.

The speaker also wants a very specific pair of shoes.


Lena and Kai are siblings. They have same Father.

You have a very specific father, namely the same one.


Also the, the, or the can be demonstrative pronouns:

The I wish for myself: a new bike.

That relates to a new bike.

Mostly one uses demonstrative pronouns to indicate something that one can see or show.

Number, gender and case: singular

To represent or accompany the various pronouns Nouns to be able to use, you have to know in which number (Number), genus (Gender) and case (Case) the Nouns stand.

Singular

Case / case Masculine Feminine neuter
Nominative
Who, what?
the tree the flower the animal
accusative
Who what?
the tree the flower the animal
dative
Whom?
the tree the flower the animal
Genitive
Whose?
of the tree the flower of the animal

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Number, gender and case: plural

Plural

Case / case Masculine Feminine neuter
Nominative
Who, what?
the trees the flowers the animals
accusative
Who what?
the trees the flowers the animals
dative
Whom?
the trees the flowers the animals
Genitive
Whose?
of trees The flowers the animals